Each of the Four Values Are Present in Every Order Experience, Production Process and Delivery

By Elisha Kasinskas, Marketing Director, Rochester Software Associates

Print services depend on 4 Value Axes: Time, Cost, Quality and Quantity. Each value is present in every order experience, production process, and delivery. You will be successful if you align your service with customer needs, automate with these values in mind, and continually improve workflow process.

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The 4 Value Axes and 9 tips across the axes.

 Time: Every action takes time. Time is expensive.
The riTimeght workflow in order, update, production, status and delivery processes decreases time bottlenecks and constraints. Your customers love a simple, intuitive order and status system.

1. Apply continuous comment and feedback systems to capture their experience.

Customers connect with people so use free, 24/7 access and personal communication when needed; it saves time. Your production team thrives when the right information is present at the ordering stage. Accurate information allows for “no questions needed” printing and finishing, and saves time.

Cost: Every action has a cost – materials, energy, people, facility and equipment.
ContiCostnuously running equipment to feed uninterrupted orders to the staff reduces expense per piece- that can be passed back to customers.

2. Find the key metric that satisfies customers and executives.

The executive team for a financial provider honed in on content as their key metric. They wanted the cost of an 8.5×11 full color, finished page reduced and monitored. By doing so, it required optimization of each cost component, including variable and versioned elements, and provided a fully loaded comparison against competitive pricing.

Quality: Quality is measured by customer standards – and every customer has a different definition.
One cQualityustomer is determined to hit spectrophotometer on pantones. Another is okay with anything their customer will accept. Quality has to match the expectations, or you will rerun, and rerun is doubly expensive. Automate with online approvals, but:

3. Ensure the production definition is negotiated against the printed product, not monitor variances.

4. Verify your customer service and production monitors to spec regularly.

5. Keep previously approved printed pieces on hand for visual verification of the customer’s expectation.

Quantity: Order quantities have plummeted in the last ten years.
QuantityHandling more orders with smaller quantities and high variability requires continuous improvement.

6. The order system must be fluid, intuitive, and handle data feeds along with print files; it must almost think for the customer.

7. An online feedback system must be as responsive to customers with one item and one order per year as it is to customers with thousands of items and hundreds of orders per month. Build A Better In-Plant

8. Ensure team members have reliable methods of hand off to one another such as bar code checkpoints that work no matter what the order size or frequency.

9. Continuously tune your workflow for regular patterns, as well as peak and slow seasons.

Want additional in-plant insights to build a better in-plant today? Sign up for our Quarterly Tips Newsletter.

Read Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 5Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, and Part 10 of this Build a Better In-plant tips series in our In-plant Insights blog, featuring valuable tips to build a better in-plant.

About the Author:

Elisha Kasinskas is Rochester Software Associates’ (RSA) award-winning Marketing Director. She is responsible for all marketing, public relations, social media and communications, and community building for the firm. Ms. Kasinskas joined RSA in 2010. She is a Marketing veteran with over 20 years of experience in sales, product management, and marketing in leading product and service business to business and business to consumer firms, including Pinnacle (Birds Eye) Foods, Global Crossing, Windstream Communications, HSBC, and a number of regional high tech firms. She holds a Rochester Institute of Technology MBA, and a BS in Marketing from Radford University. Ms Kasinskas is a frequent moderator for industry speaking sessions. She was awarded the 2015 In-Plant Printing and Mailing Association (IPMA) Outstanding contributor award, is a 2015 OutputLinks Women of Distinction inductee, and has secured multiple awards from the American Marketing Association (AMA) for recent work at RSA.

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